Carbohydrates Top Sources

Check out some of these smart carb options along with some ideas on how you can quickly incorporate them into your daily regimen using minimal ingredients.

Remember, higher GI carbohydrates may be more beneficial post-training as they have less fibre making them easier to digest. Low GI carbs have more fibre, so it could be a better option for sustained, slow energy release (fuelling up). It’s important to note that it doesn’t actually make that much difference whether the carbohydrate is high or low GI. We generally consume these foods with other macronutrients (protein & fats), so this affects the rate at which it is broken down and enters the bloodstream anyway. See our guide on high GI foods vs Low GI foods for more information here.

Don’t get hung up on minor details when it comes to your nutrition. Focus on moving well and moving often. Prioritise minimally processed whole foods the majority of the time, and you are right on track. 

Sweet potato – 20g/100g

A starchy root vegetable rich in beta-carotene, which we can convert into Vitamin A (Retinol) It’s worth noting that everyone converts at different ratios, so we should also prioritise our Vitamin A rich foods like grass-fed beef. Remember, leaving the skin on it gives us more fibre. 

Basmati Rice – 45g/cup, cooked

Slightly refined grain that should be a staple for those looking to support recovery from multiple training sessions. Very versatile and easy to digest. 

White potatoes – 21g/100g

A starchy root vegetable, and source of several B Vitamins. Remember, leaving the skin on it gives us more fibre. 

Brown rice – 52g/cup, cooked

More fibre and more calories than white rice. However, white rice may be easier to digest and therefore easier to consume, which could be beneficial for those trying to build muscle. 

Oats – 65g/100g

Oats are a great source of fibre and also Beta-glucans which have been shown to regulate cholesterol and have a modulating effect on the immune system. 

Butternut squash – 12g/100g

Great source of beta carotene, which we can convert into Vitamin A (Retinol) It’s worth noting that everyone converts at different ratios, so we should also prioritise our Vitamin A rich foods like grass-fed beef. 

Bananas – 23g/100g

Great source of potassium and prebiotic fibre meaning that it can feed beneficial bacteria in your gut. Green bananas have more fibre than riper yellow bananas as, over time, the resistant starch found in green bananas turns to sugars such as fructose, sucrose and glucose. Both yellow and green bananas are very nutritious. 

Rice noodles – 25g/100g

Rice noodles are exactly as they sound. Noodles made from rice šŸ˜‰ They are a really smart carb option because of their digestibility. For this reason, they are especially good post-workout.

Beans – 60g/100g

Beans are also high in fibre, protein and iron and folate. Common varieties include kidney, butter, black, pinto and haricot beanDon’tnā€™tbeanDon’tn’t be fooled by what you hear amongst certain influencers – Baked beans (made with Haricot beans) are actually a good option as convenience food. 

Bread – 41g/100g sliced wholemeal

Yep, that’s right, we think bread is a pretty damn good carb sourceā€¦ Remember, there are no bad foods. Wholemeal bread is rich in fibre and incredibly satisfying. Not all bread is created equal. Smaller batch companies will often take a little more time and care meaning fewer artificial ingredients. But this does not mean mainstream bread is inherently “bad”. 

Berries – 14g / 100g

varieties such as blueberries, raspberries and strawberries are high in antioxidants and a good source of vitamin C. 

Apples – 14g / 100g

Apples are high in fibre and a great quercetin source, which can help balance the immune system in those who suffer from allergies. The skin is also a great source of pectin, a specific type of fibre that feeds good bacteria. 

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